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Pierre Laval


Encyclopedia Britannica entry on Pierre Laval

(written by someone who sounds like a thoroughgoing collaborateur himself)


Laval, Pierre (b. June 28, 1883, Chateldon, Fr.--d. Oct. 15, 1945, Paris), French politician and statesman who led the Vichy government in policies of collaboration with Germany during World War II, for which he was ultimately executed as a traitor to France.

A member of the Socialist Party from 1903, Laval became a lawyer in Paris in 1909 and promptly made a name for himself by his defense of trade unionists and leftists. Elected deputy for Aubervilliers in 1914, he urged a negotiated peace to end World War I. Defeated in the 1919 election, he left the Socialist Party in 1920, became mayor of Aubervilliers (1923-44), and was reelected deputy in 1924, leaving the Chamber to become a senator in 1927. After gaining experience as minister of public works (1925), undersecretary of state (1925), minister of justice (1926), and minister of labour (1930), when he was responsible for steering the Social Insurance Act through both of the National Assembly chambers, he became premier for the first time in 1931. He early displayed a tendency to act over the heads of his ministers, especially in regard to foreign affairs. Defeated in 1932, he became minister of colonies and then minister of foreign affairs in 1934 under Gaston Doumergue and then under Pierre Flandin. Becoming premier again in 1935, Laval also took the portfolio for foreign affairs. Concerned to create a stable Europe, he made the cornerstone of his policy a strong Franco-Italian rapprochement, which eventually collapsed over the Ethiopian crisis in 1936. Domestically, Laval met financial crises by refusing to devalue the franc, cutting expenditures instead.

Laval's cabinet fell in 1936, shortly before the Popular Front victory. In 1940 he entered Marshal Petain's government as minister of state and was largely responsible for persuading the government to remain in France and accept an armistice so that there would be a legal government in Paris that could negotiate advantageous terms and, perhaps, eventually a peace treaty. He was also responsible for persuading the Assembly to dissolve itself, thus ending the Third Republic on July 10, 1940, and for the revision of the constitution. Certain of an ultimate German victory, he became convinced that France's best course lay in collaboration with Germany in order to assure France a strong role in the future. He began negotiations on his own initiative, arousing the mistrust of his fellow ministers; Petain dismissed him in December 1940.

When he returned as head of the government in 1942, France could no longer expect to be Germany's collaborator, but instead was fighting for survival as an independent state. To assure Germany of France's goodwill, Laval agreed to provide French labourers for German industries. In a famous speech (June 1942) asking for volunteers, he announced that he desired a German victory. In general, however, he tried to protect France by hard-fought compromises in negotiations with Hitler. Laval's control of France deteriorated with the growth of the resistance movement and the attacks of extremist collaborators such as Marcel Deat, with whom the Germans forced him to work.

When Germany collapsed, Laval fled to Spain, where he prepared his defense, returning to France in July 1945. On trial for treason he found himself in a hostile court, faced by a heckling jury, his defense constantly cut off. He was executed, after attempting to poison himself, on Oct. 15, 1945.

What a slimy Encyclopedia Britannica entry! Still, it is very interesting to note that Pierre Laval started out as the Clarence Darrow of France


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Professor of Economics J. Bradford DeLong, 689 Evans
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